Boxwell Staff Stories: The Anecdotes Project

We’ve had 34 responses. Surely there are more!

If you were/are a Boxwell staff member, I encourage you to complete the questionnaire below. By all means, give me your favorite camp stories/memories, but PLEASE spend some time on the leadership questions. Understanding the people and their leadership qualities/styles is an important part of my research.

I will be closing access to the survey on March 31, 2018. You have less than two weeks!

Thank you for your help. It is greatly appreciated.

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From the Archives, March 18, 2018

Montgomery Bell Tunnel

Before there was Boxwell Reservation, there was Camp Boxwell. Camp Boxwell had three previous locations: Linton, Narrows of the Harpeth, and Rock Island. This week’s photo showcases one of the highlights of Boxwell at the Narrows of the Harpeth.

Boxwell was at the Narrows from 1930 to 1948. In the early 19th century, somewhere between 1818 and 1820, an earlier owner of this property, slaveowner Montgomery Bell, had his slaves excavate a 200 foot long tunnel through solid rock–a limestone bluff in fact. The tunnel was was 8 feet high and 15 feet wide and carved through the ridge by hand. The result was to create a waterfall that would power a water wheel, which would power a hammer to forge iron. It was a masterpiece of 19th century engineering built by slave labor.

It was also a highlight of the 20th Century Boxwell location. Pictured here is the tunnel about 1940 while Boxwell was at the location. The site is worth checking out if you have the time. It is an easy hike to the tunnel. If you go, you’ll note that the Bluff Overlook trail will take you to where the VERY FIRST OA ordeals were held. The trail that takes you toward Cedar Hill Bridge takes you back to the original Waterfront. It is worth the visit!

Tunnel

The Montgomery Bell Tunnel in about 1940, as seen by Harry “Beany” Elam, who often taught “Scout School” there

Boxwell Staff Stories: The Anecdotes Project

We’ve had 24 responses. Surely there are more!
 
If you were/are a Boxwell staff member, I encourage you to complete the questionnaire below. By all means, give me your favorite camp stories/memories, but PLEASE spend some time on the leadership questions. Understanding the people and their leadership qualities/styles is an important part of my research.
 
I will be closing access to the survey on March 31, 2018. You have less than one month.
 
Thank you for your help. It is greatly appreciated.
 
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSesvmwxHrtvYw82ZTABa-yaNLr9uKgbrecnSMvUHiNebRMClQ/viewform?c=0&w=1

From the News, March 11, 2018

Snipe Hunting at Linton, 1927

It is nice to know that the more things change, the more they stay the same. So, if you’ve ever wondered to yourself how far back snipe hunting goes, well, at least until 1927!

The article here is the second week of camp at the Linton Boxwell in 1927. The Nashville Banner ran the story from the camp scribe Thomas “Tommie” Anderson.  “Walter” in the first paragraph is Walter Whittaker, the camp cook.  Also, understand that the Linton Boxwell experience was closer to a modern camporee than it was to modern Boxwell Reservation.

As you can see, half the article is about introducing the new boys at camp to the camping experience. There were about 80 boys in camp that week, 60 of whom were Scouts who were staying for a second week. It was the 20 newbies who were being hazed here. Still, as the rest of the article intimates, it was all in good fun and everyone came together for the group sporting events in the afternoon. Still, as different as Linton seems from Old Hickory, it is nice to see that snipe hunting is a time honored Scouting tradition!

“Snipe Hunt Thrills Camp Boxwell Scouts,” Nashville Banner, June 30, 1927, pg. 7

Snipe Hunting

“Snipe Hunt Thrills Camp Boxwell Scouts,” Nashville Banner, June 30, 1927, pg. 7

Boxwell Staff Stories: The Anecdotes Project